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Taro Cake

Taro Cake is a humble dish made with only a handful of ingredients. It’s a savory side dish that is normally found at Sunday Dim Sum or during your families Chinese New Year celebrations. This recipe suits the Autoimmune Protocol (AIP) and Paleo diets.

Taro Cake is a humble dish made with only a handful of ingredients. It’s a savory side dish that is normally found at Sunday Dim Sum or during your families Chinese New Year celebrations. This recipe suits the Autoimmune Protocol (AIP) and Paleo diets.

Scale

Ingredients

3 tablespoons oil, plus more for pan-frying and greasing the pans

3 slices of Bacon, chopped into small bite size pieces (you can also substitute 4 ounces bacon)

½ cup Shrimp (shelled and deveined), roughly chopped

6 scallions, chopped (about 2 cups)

1 1/22 pounds taro, cut into ½-inch cubes

2 teaspoons salt

1 teaspoon Garlic Powder

1/2 teaspoon Onion Powder

1/2 teaspoon Ground Cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon Ground Ginger

3 1/2 cups Bone Broth (divided)

1 cups Cassava flour

Extra Virgin Olive Oil (or oil of your choice)

For Servings:

Coconut Aminos

Green Onions, sliced

Instructions

Heat the oil in wok over medium heat.

Add bacon, pan-fry for 2 minutes.

Add the shrimp, stir-fry for another minute.

Add the scallions and taro, and stir-fry for 3 minutes.

Season the taro mixture with salt, garlic powder, onion powder, cinnamon and ginger.

Now add 2 cups of broth, making sure all the ingredients are evenly submerged. Cover with the lid, turn the heat down to medium low, and simmer for 8 minutes. Once it’s done cooking (the taro should be breaking down at this point, if not let it cook for a few more minutes) uncover the lid, shut off the heat, and let it cool slightly.

In a large bowl, mix the cassava flour, 1 1/2 cups chicken broth together until well combined.

Next add the taro mixture (no need to wait for it to cool completely). Mix thoroughly until a cement-like paste forms.

Generously oil two small loaf pans, and divide the mixture between the two pans. Spread the mixture evenly in the pan, making sure there are no air pockets in the mixture.

Steam the taro cakes in a double decker steamer for 45 minutes. Make sure you start with enough water so the water does not dry out halfway.

No double decker steamer? Just steam the two pans in two separate times.

If you are using a bamboo steamer, add hot water to your wok every 10 minutes to prevent the water from drying out and burning your bamboo steamer.

After 45 minutes, insert a toothpick into the taro cakes; if it comes out clean, then it’s done.

Once the taro cakes are cooled completely, you can seal the taro cakes tightly in a ziplock bag and freeze them for later.

If you’d like to eat them now, slice into rectangles.

Heat a couple tablespoons of oil in a skillet over medium heat, and pan fry the slices of taro cake on both sides until golden brown and crispy.

Sprinkle with salt and serve. You can put out a little coconut aminos with green onions for dipping, or just eat these plain!

Notes

You’ll need a steamer and two mini loaf pans for this recipe.

Keywords: dim sum, aip, paleo, taro, chinese food, asian food

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